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  • Charli

Wellness Matters 27.08.2021

Foraging


Haha! I nearly slipped down an embankment into a tangle of nettles and brambles, when I over-reached to pluck a juicy blackberry from its stem yesterday morning. I sat down on the damp ground, giggled to myself while Jilly looked on, nonplussed that I had called our walk to a sudden halt.

I eased myself back up to standing, always a tricky manoeuvre with arthritic knees, but the glistening nuggets of juice continued to tantalise and motivate me to rise to my feet. I offered one to Jilly as an apology for delaying our walk, but she turned up her nose at it and instead sniffed around for something more appealing.


Walking the same route most days, I saw what I’m sure were edible mushrooms growing by the side of the path, opposite the blackberries, but fear of touching something poisonous in this already germ infested climate held me back. I have since referred to Wild Food by Roger Phillips, one of Dad’s ‘go-to’ manuals, and am confident that they were edible field mushrooms. Next time…perhaps.


Dad was a great one for foraging when we were younger, and hours would be spent perfecting recipes for elderflower cordial, elderberry wine and of course apple and blackberry crumble. I confess I often prefer to eat on the go, but when we allow ourselves time to create before consuming, by gathering, preparing, cooking, we learn to trust a process.

Effective processes create the right conditions for growth, generating understanding and working towards a satisfactory outcome.


My blueberry bush, which is now 6 years old, has yielded its best crop ever this summer, which I’m convinced is its last ‘Hoorah!’ before it becomes pot bound. Although I promised myself I would re-pot it last year, I fear that if I don’t it will struggle to deliver its sweet purple hued berries again. In other words, if I fail to provide the necessary nutrients and process for growth, I will not be rewarded with the fruit of my labours. Having come through my own cycle of change, I recognise how important that is.


Finding a comfortable path to follow with open hearts and minds can be challenging, and inevitably, there will be unsavoury temptations to lure us down blind alleyways and tedious U-turns. But when we commit to a life worth living with authenticity, nourishment from reliable sources to stimulate good physical and mental health, an inner positive narrative becomes achievable. That is when our most authentic self is presented to family, friends and colleagues.


“Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.” Dale Carnegie.






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